ES6008: Learning to Think: Thinking to Learn

ES6008: Learning to Think: Thinking to Learn

Please note this module descriptor is indicative of the structure of this course and may be subject to change.

Module Title Learning to Think: Thinking to Learn
Module Code ES6008
Module Tutor Tristan Middleton
School School of Education and Humanities
CAT Points 15
Level of Study 6
Brief Description

The module aims to introduce students to the area of thinking skills and why this is increasingly becoming recognised as an essential aspect of successful learning. In particular, the development of a 'thinking school' or organisation will be considered in light of theoretical and practical aspects of the work in the field.

Indicative Syllabus

This module will cover the following topics:

 

the relationship between thinking and learning in children, young people and adults;

developmental, cultural and pedagogical perspectives in light of the re-examination of constructivist and socio-cultural views of learning;

what is meant by ‘thinking’ and its relationship to learning within educational contexts;

‘discrete’ versus ‘infusion’ approaches to the development of thinking; 

various approaches to developing ‘thinking skills’;

differences in cognitive intervention, brain-based learning and philosophical approaches;

Cognitive Research Trust (CoRT);

Accelerated Learning and Philosophy for Children;

‘domain-specific’ thinking skills;

Cognitive Acceleration in Science (CASE) and Maths (CAME).

Learning Outcomes

A student passing this module should be able to:

 

1, Critically consider theories of learning in relation to the wider aims of educational provision and the potential implications for children, students and adults becoming effective thinkers and problem-solvers;

2. Demonstrate an in-depth knowledge and understanding of a range of discrete and infused thinking skills programmes, identifying benefits and limitations of different models for individuals, institutions and the wider society;

3. Apply knowledge and understanding to a range of curriculum and ‘real-world’ problems, evaluating the benefits of specific models for specific aspects of educational provision and considering effective assessment strategies;

4. Work collaboratively whilst evaluating thinking skills programmes, identifying literature and research evidence, reflecting on roles within educational provision;

5. Communicate clearly and effectively their understanding of the nature and aims of thinking skills programmes and potential benefits to educational provision.

Learning and Teaching Activities Scheduled Contact Hours: 24
Independent Learning Hours: 126
Assessment (For further details see the Module Guide) 001: 40% Presentation: Individual:: 10 Minute presentation.
002: 60% Assignment: Individual: 2000 words
Special Assessment Requirements
Indicative Resources The current reading list can be found in the Module Guide, which your lecturer should make available via Moodle.

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